Roald Dahl: he’s got the magic

Roald Dahl Big Friendly Giant

Quentin Blake’s illustration of the BFG and Sophie

I have been seeing and hearing a lot about Mr. Dahl these last few weeks; one of my favourite authors, albeit, my childhood fave author.

Most recently I swiped right on someone’s profile because of the following lovely Roald Dahl quote:

Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it

We have since unmatched. Shocker.

If I were the type of woman to ink my body, I would maybe get that tattooed in Sanskrit, mirrored, on a shoulder blade in the shape of the infinity symbol.

Even more recently I have purchased tickets to Mirvish’s Matilda, a book to theatre adaptation, but one of Roald Dahl’s creations nonetheless. #mayRoaldDahlliveonforever

And in keeping with the theme of magic and suspending one’s disbelief temporarily, there is always a bit of magic to be discovered when you allow yourself to get lost in Roald Dahl’s books: incredibly large pit fruits, talking crocodiles, friendly giants, golden tickets, children loathing witches (a great film adaptation with Angelica Huston) fantastic foxes, etc., etc. How could you not love his work? His work is so plentiful, likely you’ve read some of his stuff without even knowing it (I did not know that Fantastic Mr. Fox was one of his—another great book-to-film adaptation from Wes Anderson too p.s.)

The most recent film adaptation being The BFG (1982)! A childhood favourite, though I’m only familiar with the 1989 animated version:

If you haven’t seen the trailer, or read the book, do so immediately. I am harbouring good feelings about this adaptation, though I’m trying to squelch any high expectations that might be developing.

Though I’m supes excited to see the movie, I’m not entirely sure why because I owe The BFG my thanks for my childhood reoccurring nightmares involving very unfriendly children-eating giants lurking in the night outside my bedroom window and you know, hunting me.

Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it

Heart

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